Marmon-Herrington Manuals

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Marmon Herrington CT8 parts manual
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Marmon Herrington CT16N,H,HX parts manual
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Marmon Herrington CT12H parts manual
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Marmon Herrington MT 10 parts manual
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Marmon-Herrington

Arthur Herington retired in 1931. Without wasting a second of precious time, he immediately opens the Marmon-Herrington enterprise in Indianapolis together with businessman Walter Marmon. The main direction, of course, is the production of military equipment. Using old connections, Herington immediately receives an order for three dozen Model 33T1 all-wheel-drive tankers for service at the airfields. As a matter of fact, constructively and even externally, they were all the same QMC cars. The difference was in the cheaper gearboxes, seven-liter six-cylinder engines from Hercules with a capacity of 94 hp. from. and, most importantly, in the bridges and transfer case of our own manufacture. At the same time, Herington developed and patented his own version of the Rzeppa constant velocity joints.

In the first half of the 30s, the newborn firm Marmon-Herrington develops an incredibly vigorous activity. The range of all-wheel drive trucks is supplemented by the TH series with a lifting capacity of 1.5-7.5 tons, then the A series with a lifting capacity of 1.5 to 3 tons with a simplified cab without side windows and with an awning instead of a rigid roof was released. Special vehicles-evacuators are built, half-track and tracked tractors and armored cars are designed and produced. But, alas, the American army does not yet need so much equipment - the military is buying vehicles in absolutely meager quantities. The sweet times for automotive manufacturers, when it comes to not just tens or hundreds, but thousands and even millions of pieces of equipment, will come only in 10 years. And until that moment we still have to somehow survive.

 

Fortunately, a lucrative order from Iran turned up. The Persians acquired a relatively large batch of army trucks, command and staff vehicles based on them, and chassis for armored vehicles. In addition, Marmont and Herington sold their own light tanks, very dubious from the point of view of combat qualities. A bold attempt was also made to sell the A and TH series ATVs to civilians. However, they did not enjoy much success. Firstly, because they were, to put it mildly, expensive, and secondly, because FWD, Coleman, Oshkosh and other small companies already operated in the tiny American market for civilian four-wheel drive vehicles. As a result, the joint venture of Marmont and Herington in 1935 found itself in a difficult position.

The solution was found in collaboration with the Ford Motor Company. At the same time, Marmon-Herrington sharply reduced the production of its own equipment, leaving only the heavy series, and completely focused on deep tuning of "Ford" cars. The revision consisted in the installation of a front drive axle and a two-stage transfer case of our own manufacture, new brakes and modified fenders. In addition, old Henry Ford's favorite front suspension on a transverse spring was replaced by a more convenient four-wheel drive version on longitudinal springs. And so that the frame did not crack due to the changed loads, it was significantly strengthened.

 

The youngest in the gradually expanding Ford-Marmon-Herrington family is the LD series. It was equipped with the famous "Ford" V-shaped "eight" with lower valves with a working volume of 3.6 liters and a capacity of 85 liters. from. at 3800 rpm. It had a four-speed gearbox (a three-speed gearbox was installed on conventional Fords). The first in the series was a light artillery tractor - a pickup truck with a carrying capacity of 500 kg. Its body has been simplified as much as possible. All excesses in the form of doors and roofs were eliminated as a class. But the driver and passenger sat on bucket-shaped steel seats with powerful lateral support. The portrait was completed by a protective grill that covered the entire front part. By the way, it was this pickup that became the prototype of the Soviet GAZ-61 SUV.

By 1940, Marmon-Herrington was offering almost 70 models and modifications based on Ford vehicles (as well as one chassis of its own manufacture), including heavy three-axle and half-hood models. Alas, all this interesting technique was sold with difficulty. Various special versions came to the rescue - fire trucks, snow blowers, tow trucks, construction dump trucks and even road vehicles. For example, under the frame of Ford-Marmon-Herrington trucks, a dozer blade with hydraulic cylinder control was hooked. The result was an impromptu motor grader.

Since the end of hostilities, Marmon-Herrington continues to convert Ford vehicles into SUVs. And he even offers a car of his own design based on the Ford F1 pickup - a two-door LD7-4 "Ranger" all-terrain vehicle with a 100-horsepower V8 under the hood (3.9-liter displacement). Gradually, however, Ford is beginning to ditch the services of a longtime partner. First, all-wheel drive station wagons are a thing of the past. The reason is simple - Ford in 1949 switched to a completely new family with independent front spring suspension, curved frame and low seating position. Further, in 1958, Ford established an independent production of all-wheel drive pickups. All that remains for Marmon-Herrington is the rework of medium and heavy Ford trucks.

 

Unsurprisingly, the company is looking for other ways to make money. Marmon-Herrington produces trolleybuses and semi-hood rear-wheel drive delivery vans. She also helps the French to establish the production of modern four-wheel drive army trucks. However, in 1963, the company was split into simply Marmon and, in fact, Marmon-Herrington. The first focuses all its efforts on small-scale production of expensive rear-wheel drive trucks and truck tractors. And the second produces exclusively transfer cases and axles. And now Marmon-Herrington works not only with Ford. Marmont-Herington bridges help overcome the off-road conditions of Chevrolet, GMC, International, etc. Since the 1980s, the company has been ready to put almost any American truck on four or six drive axles.

 

Marmon-Herrington is currently alive and well and is actively working with Oshkosh. In particular, the firm's transfer cases and bridges are equipped with MRAP (Mine Resistant Ambush Protected) armored vehicles, Oshkosh M-ATV models, of which more than 8 thousand units have been produced since 2009. These vehicles are actively used by American and British soldiers in Afghanistan.

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