International truck Service Manuals PDF

Download
International 1A Operator's Manual
International 1A Operator's Manual
International 1A Operator's Manual_compr
Adobe Acrobat Document 1.7 MB
Download
International Cadet 80 PDF Operating instruction
International Cadet 80 PDF Operating instruction
International Cadet 80 PDF Operating ins
Adobe Acrobat Document 3.2 MB

Download
International CUB CADET 100 Tractors Operator's Manual
International CUB CADET 100 Tractors Operator's Manual
International CUB CADET 100 Tractors Ope
Adobe Acrobat Document 664.1 KB
Download
International VT 275 V6 PDF Manual
International VT 275 V6 PDF Manual
International VT 275 V6 PDF Manual_compr
Adobe Acrobat Document 2.8 MB

 International 

International Harvester 1950. The models were again based on medium-duty trucks, dump trucks and truck tractors of the R-150 series, but the production of Metro vans and heavy multi-tonnage trucks, which were in great demand among oil producers, resumed. Also, in accordance with general trends in the truck industry, the use of diesel engines began, and cab comfort increased.

Using the accumulated experience, the company began to strive to produce a three-axle trunk tractor for long-distance transportation. Tractors of this type that appeared in the early 1950s on American roads had a very peculiar appearance: the chassis was large for the serial cab, and a rectangular hood had to be built over the engine, and a normal two-seater narrow cab was placed on top of it. In front of this structure was a chrome-plated radiator lining.

And only at the end of the fifties the company designed a normal cabin located above the engine for its main super-tractor.

 

Meanwhile, the masses International, obeying the fashion of those years, in appearance more and more approached passenger cars. Everyone - both small pickups and 10-ton dump trucks - received a new hood with compositionally combined wings, then a more spacious cabin with a panoramic windshield, two-tone color as a standard factory version. The old 6-cylinder power units gave way to more modern Y-shaped eights, both diesel and carburetor. The company has advanced to a leading position in the United States in the production of trucks for all transportation needs.

 

By the beginning of the 70s, the whole range of models was completely updated again, along the way, replaced by new all the old names of cars. International now began with Traveler pickups, followed by the Midd tonnages of the Lowdstar and Cargostar series, and completed the “supertrack” class tractors under the general name Transstar. On the basis of traveller units, in addition, they began to produce heavy and powerful Scaut four-wheel drive jeeps. Somewhat apart stood the angular, highly functional off-road and construction Paistar trucks. The most popular "LOADSTARS" were delivered with various wheel formulas: 4x2, 4x4, 6x4, and in various modifications: onboard, dump trucks, truck tractors, chassis (including for school buses). The wide square nose of these machines was the most typical feature of the company's products throughout the 70s.

International designs of all series were systematically improved, in particular, a two-circuit brake drive appeared, fully synchronized gearboxes with a huge number of ranges: turbocharging began to be used on diesel engines. The company has opened branches in Australia and Mexico.

 

On February 20, 1986, an official announcement followed: the largest truck manufacturer in the United States, known for many decades as the independent enterprise International Harvester, ceased to exist as such. The renowned name was sold along with the Tanneko Corporation agricultural machinery and road machinery division. The new leadership, without delay, set about reorganizing and modernizing, and at the same time tried to give their products a new image. The well-known New York-based firm Grossman Portuguese, which was consulted, suggested choosing a hundred names for the former International. According to mature reflections, the word Novistar was chosen as a new brand, which had not existed in the English language before, something between the terms “navigation” and “star”.

 

Of course, the change did not end with the renewal of the sign on the main office building in Chicago and the famous company logo. Much more significant changes occurred at the Springfield plant, and there five and a half thousand workers using the latest equipment deliver 325 trucks each day, providing Novistar with a solid 27% of the country's domestic market, which could hardly be achieved with the previous equipment. The firm still, despite everything, holds the first place for the production of trucks in the United States.

 Already now it’s clear that Novistar has become for America what the good old International was, and the company is winning the market, percent by percent, primarily for its long-range heavyweight supertracks.

Comments: 0